Friday, December 19, 2008

Dec 2008 Tutorials Co-Chair Clifton Forlines Tabletop 2009

Clifton from MERLI'm delighted to announce that Clifton Forlines, a Research Associate and Technical Staff member from Mitsubishi Electric Research Labs (MERL) in Cambridge MA will be joining me as Co-Chair for the Tabletop 2009 Tutorials program. This is a fantastic development as Clifton has a vast range of experience in the area of Tabletop computing and has been a prolific publisher in the field. I trust our complementary academic and industry insights will allow us to develop an exciting and high impact program for these, the first ever Tabletop tutorials.

"Clifton Forlines is Research Associate at MERL. His research interests include the design and evaluation of novel user interfaces. Current research projects span from three-dimensional presentation of and navigation through recorded digital video, to collaborative tabletop user interfaces, to using hand-held projectors for augmented reality. He is currently leading the evaluation of three projects, MediaFinder, TimeTunnel, and DiamondSpin. Before coming to MERL, Clifton worked on Carnegie Mellon's Alice project, which aimed at teaching programming to children through building interactive 3D worlds." [ more ]

Wednesday, December 17, 2008

Dec 2008 Two Conference Papers Accepted.

Myself and three of my PhD students have recently had two papers accepted at leading international conferences. Both will be published in upcoming volumes on the Springer Lecture Notes in Computer Science Series.

Firstly, myself Ross, Tom, along with our colleagues Adrian, Simon and Paddy had "Situvis: a visual tool for modeling a user's behaviour patterns in a pervasive environment" accepted at the Seventh International Conference on Pervasive Computing in Nara Japan. This year the conference had a very low acceptance rate of 18.4% which makes this all the move satisfying personally. The back story to Sitvis is a very interesting one and is a great testament to our new structured PhD program in UCD. Tom developed the core Situvis visualisation framework as part of a project he developed in my InfoVis course in 2007. He worked with Ross on developing it into a graph drawing system by using coupled layouts. We then further developed the idea when Adrian came with the situation and sensor problems and proposed Situvis which we all worked on together. The ebb and flow of ideas in and out of the students areas of core interest goes to show what great outcomes we can have with structured learning.

Secondly, myself and Umer Rashid had a paper accepted at the HCI International Conference 2009 on "Interaction Techniques for Binding Smart Phones: A Desirability Evaluation". It will be published by Springer in a multi-volume set in the Lecture Notes in Computer Science (LNCS) and Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence (LNAI) series. This conference will be held on 19-24 July 09 in San Diego, CA, USA.

Japan and the USA in 2009.. here we come for these and other papers to come...!

Tuesday, December 16, 2008

Dec 2008 AP2PS 2009 Invitation to program committee

Siena"Peer-to-peer systems have considerably evolved since their original conception, in the 90's. The idea of distributing files using the user's terminal as a relay has now been widely extended to embrace virtually any form of resource (e.g., computational and storage resources), data (e.g. files and real-time streams) and service (e.g., IP telephony, IP TV, collaboration).

More complex systems, however, require more sophisticated management solutions, and in this context P2P can become an interesting issue, playing the hole of both the target and the enabler of new management systems. Contributions are also expected address the management of P2P applications as well as the use of P2P technologies as management tools for traditional and modern systems.

The First International Conference on Advances in Peer-to-Peer Systems (AP2PS 2009) builds on the success of the First International Workshop on Computational P2P Networks ( ComP2P 2008 ) but has a broader focus. AP2PS 2009 aims at capturing the latest developments, findings and proposals in the general area of P2P computing, networking, services, and applications."

AP2PS 2009 will take place on October 11-16, 2009, in Sliema, Malta.

Important deadlines:
Submission (full paper): May 20, 2009
Notification of acceptance: June 25, 2009
Registration: July 12, 2009
Camera-ready: July 15, 2009

Monday, December 15, 2008

Dec 2008 TRIL TTP - Tenure Success and Complete!

TRILMy tenure as Principal Investigator for the TRIL Technology Platform team is now drawing to a close. It's been my great pleasure to have helped lead this excellent interdisciplinary team over the past 2 year period. Along with Professor Paddy Nixon of UCD and Michael McGrath, co-Principal Investigator from the Intel Digital Health Group we have grown this small team by over 50%. This growth has been to meet the needs of the clinical strands due to increasing levels of activity and secondly to increase the level of capabilities which can be utilised by the strands.

The function of the TTP is to provide TRIL with its technology research, interaction design capabilities and the software and hardware tools which support the research activities of the clinical strands namely Falls, Cognitive and Social. In the development and provisioning of these tools the TTP has adopted a philosophy, where possible, of a re-usable, open, modular platform to support the needs of the TRIL researchers and the wider research community. This has resulted in the development of the BioMOBIUS research platform. This platform is a combination of hardware, sensors, software and a graphical development environment that enables engineers and researchers to rapidly deploy technology solutions for biomedical research applications.
Some highlights of my tenure as TTP PI with our team have included:

  1. The release of BioMOBIUS research platform in April 2008 to the research community
  2. The growth of the TTP team by 50% and the relocation of this team to the research environment of the Complex and Adaptive Systems Laboratory UCD
  3. The proposal, planning and delivery of 3 international workshops: Intel research Amberglen, Portland, EMBS Conference, Vancouver, Canada, University College Dublin with conjunction with the EMEA Research conference
  4. The initiation of the specification process of TRIL clinical and central infrastructure setup
  5. The deployment of technology into homes to support trials by the three clinical strands
  6. The support of technology requirements for successful start-up of the TRIL clinic in St James’s
  7. The submission of Journal and Conference papers and the publication of workshop papers.

I leave the TTP knowing that I we have a stronger and more vibrant team of researchers, engineers, interaction designers, postdocs, hardware engineers and managers than when I arrived in 2007. As I move onto two new major research initiatives with national and international collaborators I wish all the members of TRIL all the very best going forward.

Friday, December 12, 2008

Dec 2008 Conference Co-Chair, I-HCI 2009 the third conference of the Irish HCI Community

TCD - Venue for I-HCI 2009I am the co-chair for the I-HCI 2009 along with Gavin Doherty from Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. I-HCI 2009 is the third conference of the Irish HCI Community. Held in Trinity College Dublin on the 17th and 18th of September it is organised and sponsored by the School of Computer Science and Statistics, Trinity College Dublin and the School of Computer Science and Informatics, University College Dublin. This two day event aims to bring together researchers, students and practitioners through a paper program (long and short) and a range of new tracks and events for the 2009 conference. Human Computer Interaction research and developments are targetted at augmented human activity and enriching our life experiences.

The Irish HCI community is evolving with the establishment of the ACM SIGCHI chapter and as such the 2009 program will not be based around a specific theme. Instead, we encourage submissions on novel HCI concepts, insightful surveys of existing work, or concrete, significant, transferable research based on the implementation and evaluation of a working system. In addition, we encourage more speculative short papers (upto 4 pages) may report work in progress or an interesting idea that is not yet fully developed.

I-HCI 2009 follows on from the great success of the past two conference events, I-HCI 2008 at the University College Cork, September 19th & 20th and I-HCI 2007 in the University of Limerick on May 2nd.

Wednesday, December 10, 2008

Dec 2008 Workshop Chair, Pervasive 2010 - The Eighth International Conference on Pervasive Computing

May 2010, Helsinki Finland

Festival Hall at the University of Helsinki

I have been invited to be one of the Workshop Chairs for Pervasive 2010, The Eighth International Conference on Pervasive Computing 17-20 May 2010. Our workshops and the main conference will be held in the Festival Hall at the University of Helsinki Finland. While this event is over 17 months away we will be soliciting targeted workshops and large Pervasive Computing project organisers to come to Helsinki. Example workshops might be collocated with an FP7 project review eg. (day 1 project meeting and day 2 open Pervasive 2010 workshop). Other workshops will be solicited directly from leading research groups in areas of interest to Pervasive but which have not traditionally had a strong presence here. Finally, we will be issuing a general calls for workshops to the entire community, as always.

We expect the open call, targeted call and invited workshops to provide a stimulating and exciting workshop program to compliment the main conference in 2010. If you have an idea now for a workshop, please do get in touch.

Monday, December 08, 2008

Dec 2008 Tutorials Chair, IEEE Tabletop and Interactive Surfaces 2009

Nov 2009 in Banff Canada...

TableTop 2009
I have been invited to be chair of the tutorials track for the Symposium on Tabletops and Interactive Surfaces 2009 to be held on Nov 23 to 25 in Banff Canada. This is the fourth event of this series and we expect this tutorial session to be an excellent opportunity for students, academics and practitioners to learn from leaders in this field.

The use of the tabletop as an input/output device is an exciting and emerging research area. This cross-disciplinary domain brings together experts in projector based display systems, augmented reality, user interface technologies, multi-modal interaction, input and sensing technologies, CSCW, and information visualization.

Saturday, December 06, 2008

Dec 2008 Program Co-Chair, Pervasive Advertising Workshop @ Pervasive 2009

Website goes live.
May 2009 in Nara Japan.....

"The Pervasive Advertising workshop focusses on how Pervasive Technology is shaping the future of advertising. Technologies including digital signage, ambient displays, mobile phones, haptic interfaces and e-newspapers create a pervasive media environment that disrupts established advertising business models such as sponsorship, publishing houses, out-of-home (e.g. billboard) advertising and TV advertising. We believe that pervasive advertising will soon affect a majority of the world's urban population, both positively and negatively. Potential opportunities
will centre on the ubiquitous provision of calm and interesting information.

Particular threats are pervasive SPAM and pervasive surveillance, as advertisers try to establish who looks at their ads. This workshop aims at bringing together researchers to forecast opportunities and threats from this development and shape the future of urban citizen. We encourage participants who are excited by or afraid of pervasive advertising to apply to attend this workshop."

Tuesday, December 02, 2008

Dec 2008 SIGCHI Ireland Launch Sponsorship

Today we had the SIGCHI Ireland Inaugural Lecture by Professor Alan Dix. He gave an inspiring talk on "Human-Computer Interaction in the early 21st century: a stable discipline, a nascent science, and the growth of the long tail". Thanks to the research startup support my School of Computer Science and Informatics has given me, I was able to sponsor Prof. Dix’s trip. The School of Computer Science and Statistics at Trinity College Dublin sponsored the launch reception after hosting the talk itself! A great event was had by all and we look forward to many such events in the future.

Saturday, November 29, 2008

Nov 2008 Two CHI 2009 workshop papers accepted.

Myself and members of my research group have had two of our workshop position papers accepted for CHI 2009.

The first paper entitled "Designing for Collaboration: Professional Information Management (PIM) in Research Communities" by Umer Rashid and Dr. Aaron Quigley has been accepted for the CHI 2009 workshop on The Changing Face of Digital Science: New Practices in Scientific Collaborations. The workshop will take place on Sunday, April 5, 2009 in Boston. In this paper, we report on the results of a case study exploring the use of collaborative tools in a research community. We conducted a questionnaire-based survey among 30 researchers to establish their preferences for different tools to collaborate with their research group, school and remote colleagues. Based on the results of this survey, we offer design guidelines for collaboration tools.

The second paper entitled “Do Pattern Languages help us Structure Evaluations in Healthcare Technologies?” by Dr. Julie Doyle, Dr. Aaron Quigley and Prof. Paddy Nixon has been accepted for the proceedings of the CHI (Computer Human Interaction) 2009 workshop ‘Evaluating New Interactions in Healthcare: Challenges and Approaches’.

As healthcare technologies are becoming increasingly pervasive, moving from controlled clinical and laboratory settings to large numbers of home deployments, new challenges arise in evaluating the impact of healthcare technologies and interactions in their context of use. This paper examines the potential benefits of using pattern languages to help structure such evaluations. Pattern languages can capture experience, guidelines and methods for evaluation of new healthcare technologies and ultimately help healthcare professionals and researchers to design effective evaluations.

This workshop will provide an opportunity for participants to share experiences and ideas on how to conduct evaluations that will allow assessment of the overall impact of technology in its context of use. The workshop will take place in Boston, on April 4th 2009.

Wednesday, November 26, 2008

Nov 2008 ODCSSS 2009 - Theme Announced "Technologies for bridging the digital-physical divide: sensing the environment"

ODCSSSWe have announced the theme for ODCSSS 2009 "Technologies for bridging the digital-physical divide: sensing the environment".

ODCSSS is 12 week undergraduate summer research internship program between the University College Dublin (UCD) and Dublin City University (DCU) Ireland. This program offers a distributed and interdisciplinary research environment at the forefront of ICT research.

Each ODCSSS student is engaged in a research project with a faculty member and mentor which provides them an opportunity to experience research. The program offers paid internship awards and opens for applications in December of each year for the following summer. The selection of interns is highly competitive but we encourage anyone interested in research who is eligible to apply. Our Introduction page and Objectives pages have more details on the overall program. Our News page has extensive updates of the ongoing ODCSSS activities each year and our Students page has details of our over 60 past students.

Tuesday, November 25, 2008

Nov 2008 Pervasive 2009 Workshop - Pervasive Advertising

Today Jörg Müller from the University of Münster, Albrecht Schmidt from University of Duisburg-Essen, Bo Begole from PARC USA and myself had our workshop on "Pervasive Computing will change the Future of Advertising" (www.pervasiveadvertising.org) accepted at Pervasive 2009, the Seventh International Conference on Pervasive Computing which will be held May 11-14, 2009 in Nara, Japan. This annual conference is the premier forum for researchers to present their latest results in all areas related to architecture, design, implementation, application and evaluation of pervasive computing. I'm also a member of the steering committee (along with Albrecht and others), so it's great to see the conference go from strength to strength!

"The Pervasive Advertising workshop focusses on how Pervasive Technology is shaping the future of advertising. Technologies including digital signage, ambient displays, mobile phones, haptic interfaces and e-newspapers create a pervasive media environment that disrupts established advertising business models such as sponsorship, publishing houses, out-of-home (e.g. billboard) advertising and TV advertising. We believe that pervasive advertising will soon affect a majority of the world's urban population, both positively and negatively. Potential opportunities
will centre on the ubiquitous provision of calm and interesting information.

Particular threats are pervasive SPAM and pervasive surveillance, as advertisers try to establish who looks at their ads. This workshop aims at bringing together researchers to forecast opportunities and threats from this development and shape the future of urban citizen. We encourage participants who are excited by or afraid of pervasive advertising to apply to attend this workshop."

Albrecht blogged about this earlier in the year and highlighted some interesting uses of Pervasive Computing in advertising with "Beamvertising".



Other examples I found are.

Advertising in a pervasive computing environment [ACM]

"The advent of the internet has revolutionized the field of advertising by providing a whole new path for reaching potential customers. Studies show that online advertising is, on the whole, extremely effective and that consumer acceptance of online advertising is comparable to traditional media[7][8]. One of the reasons for the high effectiveness of online advertising is that users interact with the web at a far more personal and intimate level than they interact with other advertising media like the radio or television. Pervasive computing environments deal with users at an even more intimate level; hence such environments are even better advertising platforms than the web. Pervasive environments allow the delivery of relevant advertising in suitable ways to selected consumers. In this paper, we examine some of the possibilities of pervasive advertising as well as some of the issues involved."

And using ubiquitous computing in interactive mobile marketing - S Kurkovsky, K Harihar

Student papers Advertising in Ubiquitous Environment.

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

Nov 2008 Invited Speaker, ICT Lyon 2008 "Health@Home"

I have been invited to speak at the Eurescom's networking session on "Health@Home - A new paradigm for prevention and chronic disease management". The session will take place at the Lyon Congress Centre, room Saint Clair 4, on Wednesday, 26 November 2008, 9:00 - 10:30 during the ICT 2008 in Lyon from the 25-27th of November.

"The biennial ICT Event (formerly called the "IST Event") is the most important forum for discussing research and public policy in information and communication technologies at European level. The Event brings together researchers and innovators, policy and business decision-makers working in the field of digital technologies." [ Read More ]

"The purpose of this session is to initiate multi-disciplinary projects between network operators, service providers, manufacturers and e-health experts on the research challenges to create Health@Home applications and services. These services will empower citizens to manage their own health in the home environment with optimal medical support through remote monitoring and reliable on-demand health advice. This is particularly relevant in the context of the ageing European society and increases in chronic diseases.

It is now necessary to integrate the expertise of the health, technology, telecoms and homecare sectors to re-invent both active health management and treatment in the home environment. The Health@Home paradigm on health-supporting ICT solutions integrates health management, disease prevention and treatment of chronic conditions in the home environment. The Health@Home vision entails a seamless continuation of healthcare from the hospital to the home." [ Read PDF ]

Monday, November 17, 2008

Nov 2008 Irish Chapter of ACM SIGCHI Launch (Dec 2nd)

Irish Research into Human-Computer Interaction

A new Irish Chapter of ACM SIGCHI will be officially launched at Trinity College Dublin on Tuesday 2 December 2008, 4pm, reception to follow.

SIGCHI brings together people working on the design, evaluation, implementation, and study of interactive computing systems for human use. The Irish chapter brings together researchers and designers from across the Irish third level and commercial sector. With ever increasing amounts of technology in our cars, mobile phones, workplace and private lives, there is a huge challenge faced in designing systems which meet the needs of people in the real world.

Prof. Liam Bannon, Chair of the Irish SIGCHI, and Director of the Interaction Design Centre at the University of Limerick, welcomed this announcement, noting "While research has been done over many years in Irish Universities that fits under the umbrella of HCI, until relatively recently there have been few fora for researchers and practitioners to come together to share their experiences and discuss developments in this increasingly important interdisciplinary field. With the launch of an annual Irish HCI Conference series in 2007, and now the establishment of this ACM SIGCHI Chapter in Ireland, we are well on the way to creating a thriving and successful professional infrastructure to promote all aspects of HCI within Ireland, and provide a clear identity for the field in Ireland at the EU and international level."

The launch will be accompanied by an inaugural lecture from Professor Alan Dix of the University of Lancaster as detailed below.

NOTE: Please RSVP your attendance by Tuesday the 25th of November to sigchi.ireland@gmail.com

---
SIGCHI Ireland Inaugural Lecture - Prof. Alan Dix

Human-Computer Interaction in the early 21st century: a stable discipline, a nascent science, and the growth of the long tail

Tuesday 2 December 2008, 4pm, reception to follow.

Venue: Lloyd Building LB08 Trinity College Dublin

(See http://sigchi.cs.tcd.ie)

Abstract:
In this talk I will give a personal view of the state of HCI as a design discipline and as a scientific discipline and how this is changing in the face of new technological and social situations. Going back 20 years a frequent topic of discussion was whether HCI was a 'discipline'. It is unclear whether this was ever a fruitful topic, but academic disciplines are effectively about academic communities and the establishment of SIGCHI Ireland is yet another sign of the long term stability of the international HCI/CHI community. However, as in computer 'science', the central scientific core of HCI is perhaps still unclear. A strength of HCI is the closeness between theory and practice, but the corresponding danger is that the two are often confused.

For twenty years the desktop GUI interface has been dominant, but in recent years the computer has 'escaped' the office desktop into the physical world of ubiquitous computing, into the virtual world of the internet, into our homes and our social lives. I will discuss one such change the move from a small number of applications used by many people to a 'long tail' of large numbers of applications used by small numbers of people. This change calls for different practical design strategies; focusing on the peak experience of a few rather than acceptable performance for many ... or as I sometimes refer to it 'Mars Bar vs. baked bean design'.

These changes are a challenge and an opportunity for new research and novel designs. However, as we see more diversity both in terms of types of systems and kinds of concerns, this may also be an opportunity to reflect on what is core across these; potential fragmentation becoming a locus to understand more clearly what defines HCI, not just for the things we see now, but for the future that we cannot see.

Alan Dix is Professor of Computing at Lancaster University. He has taught and researched in human-computer interaction (HCI) for over 20 years, has published over 300 articles and is author of one of the key textbooks in the area. He began as a mathematician at Cambridge University (and mathematics is still his first love) but moved into computing and HCI whilst doing his PhD at University of York. He has worked in several universities, agricultural engineering research, local government, hi-tech start-ups and even submarine design.

His research interests are eclectic: formalisation and design, physicality and digitality, the economics of information, structure and creativity and the modelling of dreams. Recently he and a colleague have developed technology for autonomous pixels that can be configured to turn any surface or space into a two or three dimensional display

For more information contact Dr. Gavin Doherty Vice-Chair (TCD) or Dr. Aaron Quigley Secretary/Treasurer (UCD). Gavin.Doherty@cs.tcd.ie, aquigley@ucd.ie

NOTE: Please RSVP your attendance by Tuesday the 25th of November to sigchi.ireland@gmail.com

Wednesday, November 12, 2008

Nov 2008 Emil Vassev starts as a postdoctoral fellow

Emil VassevWelcome to Dr. Emil Vassev from
Concordia University in Montreal, Canada to the Systems Research Group. Emil recently completed his Ph.D. in Computer Science and his thesis was on ASSL a "Framework for Specification and Code Generation of Autonomic Systems".

ASSL: Autonomic System Specification Language is a framework that implies a multi-tier structure for specifying autonomic systems. The ASSL framework is defined through formalization tiers. Over these tiers, ASSL provides a layered structure for specifying ASs as formal executable models. ASSL defines an AS with its interaction protocol and autonomic elements.

Earlier this year Emil had a paper with Mike Hinchey the new research director for Lero so we expect this collaboration to continue as new ones develop with us all here in the SRG. The paper was entitled "Towards an ASSL Specification Model for NASA Swarm-Based Exploration Missions." Proceedings of the 23rd Annual ACM Symposium on Applied Computing (SAC 2008).

Emil was awarded a highly competitive IRCSET Postdoctoral Fellowship earlier this year to join me as a postdoc in the SRG. Over the coming weeks Emil will give some informal seminars on his research both here and in Limerick. In time he will give a seminar during an RSS and as a school seminar.

Tuesday, November 04, 2008

Nov 2008 Two Journal Papers Published

Congrats to two of my students Brendan and Ross on our recent journal papers which have been published in high profile venues with high impact factors. The work on both of these projects continues so I expect we will have more Journal papers in the future on these topics.

  • Sheehan B., Quigley A., Gaudin B. and Dobson S., A relation based measure of semantic similarity for gene ontology annotations. BMC Bioinformatics 2008, 9:468 (4 November 2008)
  • Knox A., Clear A., Shannon R., Coyle L., Dobson S., Quigley A. and Nixon P., Scatterbox: a Context-Aware Message Forwarding Platform, 2008, Journal Revue d'Intelligence Artificielle pp.549-568, RSTI serie RIA - Volume 22 No 5/2008, (ISBN 978-2-7462-2261-8)

Saturday, October 18, 2008

Oct 2008 TRIL wins Irish Healthcare Award

The Irish Medical Times awarded TRIL the 'Best Use of IT in Healthcare' at the annual Irish Healthcare Awards. The prestigious awards took place on 16th October. The awards began in 2002 and have attracted increasing number of entries from individuals and groups all around the country. Companies and organisations that develop innovative IT solutions which are applicable in healthcare delivery were invited to send an outline of their services and products into the panel of judges.

The award TRIL received was for "the innovative use of information technology in a healthcare context to improve efficiencies in the health service and deliver better patient care". This is an amazing achievement for TRIL as a whole and specifically for the TRIL clinic . On behalf of everyone in the TTP in TRIL we would like to congratulate everyone in TRIL who helped make the winning entry for this award possible.

Sunday, October 12, 2008

Oct 2008 PhD External Examiner Computing Department, Lancaster University.

In October 2008 I had the pleasure of being the external examiner for Mr. Geoffrey Ellis a PhD student of Professor Alan Dix in the Department of Computing at Lancaster University UK. Over the course of a long day Geoff gave a robust and excellent defence of his work which is ground breaking with regard to the understanding of clutter, its understanding, measurement and removal. Professor Alan Dix will be in Dublin December 2008 for the Launch of Irish Chapter of ACM SIGCHI where he will present its Inaugural Lecture.

Tuesday, October 07, 2008

Oct 2008 PhD-position: Collaborative Tabletop Recommender - CLARITY

University College Dublin as part of the CLARITY research centre is seeking an exceptional candidate to apply for a postgraduate (PhD) research scholarship on a "Collaborative Tabletop Recommender" project.

CLARITY, the Centre for Sensor Web Technologies is a joint initiative between University College Dublin and Dublin City University and supported by the Tyndall National Institute. CLARITY is a research centre that focuses on the intersection between two important research areas, Adaptive Sensing and Information Discovery, to develop innovative new technologies of critical importance to Ireland's future industry base and contribute to improving the quality of life of people in areas such as personal health, digital media and management of our environment. http://www.clarity-centre.com

Funding is available for a student to start in Jan 2009 or July 2009. The post will remain open until filled but preference will be given, in this first round call, to candidates who apply before Oct 31st 2008. Funding includes a scholarship, fee payment and an equipment and travel allowance. The use of equipment and travel budget is by agreement with academic supervisors.

The position is supervised by Dr. Aaron Quigley and Professor Barry Smyth.
http://www.csi.ucd.ie/staff/aquigley/home
http://www.cs.ucd.ie/Staff/AcademicStaff/bsmyth/

This post will be advertised in May 2009 for a start in Sept 2009.

Friday, October 03, 2008

Oct 2008 Neil Cowzer start as an IRCSET funded postgrad

Neil CowzerNeil Cowzer has joined me this week as a postgraduate in the SRG. Neil recently completed his undergraduate in UCD and achieved a 1:1 in BSc Computer Science for his efforts. An ODCSSS 06 alumni, Neil has undertaken numerous research internships; taking part in IBM Extreme Blue 08 as one of their top placed hires and working with the Machine Learning Group (MLG) under the supervision of Pádraig Cunnigham, who Neil continued to work with on his final year project. Neil is based on the 3rd floor in CASL so he can collaborate with other researchers in the SRG.

Neil has been awarded an IRCSET scholarship researching Software Engineering of Pervasive Computing Systems. His initial focus is on the application of dataflow programming principles in pervasive computing, with a view to developing a suitable framework for the development of future pervasive/ubiquitous systems. The SRG has become a hot-bed of development in this area. With this in mind, Neil hopes to collaborate with a number of researchers in the group, in particular we expect Neil to be working closely with Umer Rashid.

Tuesday, September 30, 2008

Sept 2008 IEEE TableTop Session Chair

Our FTIR Tabletop in UCdLater this week I will be a session chair for Session 6 on Different Views: Display Techniques for Interactive Surfaces at Tabletop'08 the 3rd IEEE Tabletops and Interactive Surfaces Conference in Amsterdam. After being on the PC and reviewing many excellent papers I'm looking forward to attending both the bootcamp on FTIR development on Wednesday and the conference on Thursday and Friday. We have built a very large FTIR table that you can see to the left here so I'd like to learn more about possible refinements to improve its robustness etc. Our current projects with this surface revolve around collaborative visualisation in the Many-Hands project and coupling it with personal displays in coupled displays.

"The use of the tabletop as an input/output device is an exciting and emerging research area. This cross-disciplinary domain brings together experts in projector based display systems, augmented reality, user interface technologies, multi-modal interaction, input and sensing technologies, CSCW, and information visualization.

The purpose of the workshop is to bring together leading researchers in the field so that they can present and exchange current results of ongoing investigations. The 3rd IEEE TABLETOP Workshop will be held on October 2-3, 2008 in Amsterdam, the Netherlands with Sriram Subramanian & Shahram Izadi as TABLETOP Co-Chairs."

TableTop Logo

Wednesday, September 24, 2008

Sept 2008 VAST Challenge committee travel grant to Mike Farrugia

Mike Farrugia won an award for his submission to the IEEE VAST research contest. As part of this he will be presenting in the USA next month.

Animating Multivariate Dynamic Social Networks Node-Link Animation (Cell Phone mini challenge) - Michael Farrugia, Aaron Quigley

The VAST Challenge committee chairs have also awarded him a travel grant to support his attendance at the conference from the NSF SEMVAST (Scientific Evaluation Methods for Visual Analytics Science and Technology) grant. This is a great achievement for a graduate student holding down a full time job and working on his graduate studies part time. Kudos to Mike and his employers for supporting his time with this.

Sunday, September 21, 2008

Sept 2008 UbiComp 2008 workshops

This week two of my students and some of my collaborators presented three workshop papers we had accepted at the UbiComp 2008 Workshops in Korea. These papers will form the basis for full paper submissions to future conferences and Journals as the methods, models and techniques are refined and validated through experiments (both user study and simulation).


  1. Rashid U. and Quigley A., "Ambient Displays in Academic Settings: Avoiding their Underutilization", Ambient Information Systems Workshop at UbiComp 2008, September 21 COEX, Seoul, South Korea


  2. Clear A.K, Shannon R., Holland T., Dobson S., Quigley A. and Nixon P., "Multiverse: parallel visualisations of multivariate context information", 2nd Workshop on Ubiquitous Systems Evaluation (USE '08) at UbiComp 2008


  3. Kenny E., Shannon R. and Quigley A., "Stay-in-touch: a system for ambient social reminders", Ambient Information Systems Workshop at UbiComp 2008, September 21 COEX, Seoul, South Korea

Thursday, September 11, 2008

Sept 2008 Clique: Graph & Network Analysis Cluster Site Visit

I am one of the six Principal Investigators for the proposed Clique: Graph & Network Analysis Strategic Research Cluster (SRC). I lead the Visulisation workpackage within the Clique cluster. On the 11th of September along with my collaborators, industry partners and collaborating academic participants we had our full day site visit from an international review panel appointed by the SFI. As you can appreciate both the pre-proposal and full proposal required considerable effort to develop. After the pre-proposal and then full international postal reviews (which were very complete and detailed) we were one of the very few groups to be called to a site visit to present our cluster proposal.

The cluster program requires substantive engagement with local SMEs and larger corporations. CLIQUE has this with a great set of complementary industry partners. For this SRC this engagement is crucial as our partners have access to the voluminous data and applied research questions. These and other issues can give rise to insightful questions but yet basic research challenges. The entire process is very rigourous with substantial international peer-review at each stage. The site visit itself was an amazing opportunity to present our proposal to a panel of academic and industrial researchers leaders. I went first (No pressure!) after our cluster lead Pádraig Cunningham presented the cluster overview. Their questions and feedback were welcome, challenging and engaging! Clearly, the research problems identified here, when solved in Ireland can yield both high quality research outputs for us and significant industry impact.

In CLIQUE, we believe that research in data analysis in the coming years will be transformed by access to large-scale data resources. An area of particular importance in data analysis is the study of collections of entities and the links between them. This research cluster will address the development of computational techniques for the analysis and visualisation of such network data. The research will be driven by the requirements of network analysis in social networks and biological networks. While these are two quite different application areas, at a data level the problems have similar structure and the practice of applying techniques developed in one area to the other is well established. In particular the transfer of techniques developed for social network analysis to biological networks has had a huge impact in recent years.

Thursday, August 28, 2008

Aug 2008 International Workshops at EMBC Canada and Intel USA

EMBC AmberGlen BioMOBIUS workshopsAlong with my industrial co-PI Dr. Michael McGrath on the TRIL technology platform we recently demonstrated our BioMOBIUS research platform internationally. We were joined in these presentations by our colleagues Drs. Karl O'Donovan and Julie Doyle and our head of software Brian O'Mullane. We first showcased our toolkit at an event in Intel Amberglen Oregon. This event allowed those who attended to learn how to use BioMobius but it also allowed us to gain valuable feedback through a detailed user study of the event.

Following this event our group along with the TRIL co-director Terry Dishongh presented our EMBC workshop. Our event was on "Platform Oriented Approaches to Biomedical Application Development for In-lab and In-home Deployments" at the 30th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Here again from a different class of user, we gained feedback through a detailed user study of the event.

The success of biomedical systems that enable research both in lab and in the home is predicated on the available of ICT solutions which can be used throughout the research community. The success of technology in other domains such as the internet, personal computers has been based on a set of fundamental tools is necessary to ensure interoperability, rapid development, and user confidence. This workshop reviewed the challenges associated with development of systems to support biomedical research both in the laboratory and in the home. The key characteristics of a reusable toolbox were defined. These tools, by necessity, will be heterogeneous and diverse – ranging from body sensor networks to mobile communication devices to home based monitoring systems. Practical demonstrations of how the features have been realized in an open, extensible and reusable toolbox based on the TRIL centre's BioMOBIUS™ research platform were included throughout the workshop.

BIOMOBIUS comprises of both hardware and software components that support rapid application prototyping and development of biomedical research systems which incorporate a wide range of monitoring capabilities.

Wednesday, August 27, 2008

Aug 2008 Microsoft Techtalk: Social Network Visualisation

MS IrelandOn Monday the 25th of August I gave an invited Techtalk on Social Network Visualisation at Microsoft Ireland. I was invited to present by Andrzej after meeting him at AVI 2008 in Naples Italy in June.

The talk discussed the history and purpose of social network analysis and visualisation. I also gave details on a range of interactive visual representations (algorithms and methods) for abstract relational data. This visual display of data aids in human exploration and understanding of it. It is a key research
challenge. Network Visualisation is concerend with the sourcing, management, layout, drawing, viewing and interaction with relational data.

Visualisation relies on a human to guide the application of methods, structuring of queries and control of the interaction in the pursuit of understanding. In practice, the network data of interest arises from domains including social science (criminal networks, transaction networks, standard social networks, phone-call networks and disease transmission networks), bioinformatics (metabolic networks and protein-protein interaction) and ICT (computer networks, software calls and neural networks). The essential idea in relational information visualization is that the a person’s perceptual abilities are employed to understand and explore such information. Visually, humans can perceive more patterns linking local features in the data.

While research in other fields such as data mining, machine learning and knowledge management are also attempting to aid in the analysis of such voluminous data, there is a realisation that the “human-in-the-loop” visualisation affords a visual analysis of data not possible through automation alone.

Network visualisation is a broad topic so to help contextualize it I limited the scope to social networks. As such, the focus of this talk is to survey the fundamental algorithms, methods and interaction techniques along with research in my own group required to visualise large and dynamic social networks.

Short BIO:
Dr. Aaron Quigley is a College Lecturer in the School of Computer Science & Informatics, University College Dublin, a Principal Investigator in TRIL, an CAS IBM Visiting Scientist, UCD director of ODCSSS, coordinator for the EU FP7 SA CAPSIL and a researcher in Lero the Irish Software Engineering Research Centre. His research interests include pervasive computing, software engineering, information visualisation, human computer interaction, graph drawing, location and context awareness, peer-to-peer computing, surface interaction and network analysis.

He is the Program Co-Chair for the 4th International Symposium on Location- and Context-Awareness, (LoCA 2009) Tokyo Japan, the Late Breaking Results Co-Chair, Pervasive 2008, Sydney, Australia and Program Co-Chair, PPD'08 Workshop on designing multi-touch interaction techniques for coupled public and
private displays, AVI 2008 Naples Italy. He has published over 65 internationally peer-reviewed publications including edited volumes, journal papers, book chapters, conference and workshop papers. His current team consists of 23 including; 7 postgraduate students, 2 postdocs, 3 research interns along with 11 TRIL research and developers based in UCD. At postgraduate level, he has graduated 1 PhD, 1 MSc and 6 Minor MSc thesis.

http://www.csi.ucd.ie/staff/aquigley/home/?Introduction:Bio

Thursday, August 14, 2008

Aug 2008 Invitation to Speak SENIOR project Brussels

I have been invited to present a talk on Ubicomp User Interfaces at the SENIOR project workshop in Brussels on Ubiquitous Computing on Sept 8th.

The SENIOR project is examining issues related to ethics, privacy, and social inclusion in the context of ICT for the Elderly. The dialogue that they are conducting on these topics will lead to a roadmap for policy and technology development as this area continues to grow and evolve. As a part of this dialogue, they are conducting a series of five workshops beginning on the 8th of September, and the first one is focused upon Ubiquitous Computing, technologies expected to have a significant impact in the living environment for the elderly in the years to come.

Tuesday, August 12, 2008

Aug 2008 VAST 2008 and congrats to Mike Farrugia

VAST
Congratulations to Mike Farrugia one of my MSc students as he is one of the VAST 2008 Challenge Award Winners. His node-link animation submission to the contest was given one of these awards due to the "innovative visualizations, excellent analysis, and outstanding functionality demonstrated in the visual analytic environments" shown. Congrats Mike! More details here when I get them.

Friday, August 08, 2008

Aug 2008 Three new papers and a poster accepted

Along with students and colleagues we had a series of workshop and poster papers accepted recently.


  1. Rashid U. and Quigley A., "Ambient Displays in Academic Settings: Avoiding their Underutilization", Ambient Information Systems Workshop at UbiComp 2008, September 21 COEX, Seoul, South Korea




  2. Clear A.K, Shannon R., Holland T., Dobson S., Quigley A. and Nixon P., "Multiverse: parallel visualisations of multivariate context information", 2nd Workshop on Ubiquitous Systems Evaluation (USE '08) at UbiComp 2008


  3. Kenny E., Shannon R. and Quigley A., "Stay-in-touch: a system for ambient social reminders", Ambient Information Systems Workshop at UbiComp 2008, September 21 COEX, Seoul, South Korea



  4. Duffy B., Carr H. and Quigley A., Efficient Clustering for Interval Trees, poster (non-archival publication) VisWeek 2008, October 19-24 in Columbus, Ohio, USA

Wednesday, August 06, 2008

Friday, August 01, 2008

Aug 2008 CAPSIL Tokyo

Capsil LogoDr. Aaron Quigley the CAPSIL co-ordinator attended the second CAPSIL Workshop, held in Waseda University Tokyo from 30-31, July. He presented a co-ordinator report to the CAPSIL consortium members.

CAPSIL (International Support Action of a Common Awareness and Knowledge Platform for Studying and Enabling Independent Living) is an EU funded support action under FP7. This workshop brought together consortium members from three regions (US, Japan, and EU). These represent extensive teams who are developing hardware/software/knowledge solutions in independent living. Each CAPSIL meeting will have an increasingly expansive set of objectives in order to involve the entire independent living community from all three regions (US, Japan, and EU), in the process of developing our roadmap and instantiating CAPSILs. Included during the two day event was a visit to the Waseda University Joint Institution for Advanced Biomedical Sciences along with policy, funding and independant living research presentations from, Prof. Toshiyo Tamura (Chiba University), Mr. Dai Hiyama (Yamatake Co.), Mr. Tatsuya Yamazaki (NICT) and Mr. Kunihiko Niwa (JST/CRDS).

Each of the work packages within CAPSIL will be used to create the technical research roadmap for independent living. This roadmap will be used to help inform upcoming funding calls in the EU, Japan and the US.
To learn more, visit http://www.capsil.org/

Tuesday, July 22, 2008

July 2008 BioMobius in the News

For now, researchers in University College Dublin, St James’ Hospital and the Technology Research for Independent Living Centre (TRILC) are going to use SHIMMER, but Daly expects it to move into the more commercial field within a year or so. Each kit costs €1,900. (news)

When used as part of the BioMOBIUS Research Platform, developed by the TRILC, SHIMMER helps researchers reduce the time spent developing core foundation technologies, allowing them to focus on their own specific research and, subsequently, cutting down development time for advanced medical devices, according to Realtime.

Tuesday, July 01, 2008

July 2008 Pervasive 2009 Program Committee invitation

Pervasive 2009Today I agreed to serve on the program committee for Pervasive 2009. I was invited to serve by A.J. Brush, Adrian Friday, Yoshito Tobe the program committee co-chairs. This annual conference provides a premier forum for researchers to present their latest results in all areas related to architecture, design, implementation, application and evaluation of pervasive computing as it integrates into our lives.

I look forward to being involved with this conference again this year. The submissions, pre-PC meeting and PC meeting itself are always exciting and challenging for all. The submission deadline this year is October 17th and the program committee meeting will be held in Cambridge, England at Microsoft Research Cambridge. Pervasive 2009, the Seventh International Conference on Pervasive Computing, will be held May 11-14, 2009 in Nara, Japan. It will include a highly selective single-track program for technical papers, accompanied by late-breaking result posters, videos, demonstrations, workshops, a doctoral colloquium and other events. LoCA 2009 the 4th International Symposium on Location and Context Awareness will be held in Tokyo Japan in May 2009 prior to Pervasive 2009.

Websites:
http://www.pervasive2009.org/
http://loca2009.context-aware.org/

Sunday, June 22, 2008

June 2008 Journal Special Issue Call

Along with colleagues in Microsoft and Bristol we are editing a special issue of a journal to follow on from our PPD workshop last month in Italy.

Call for Papers for Personal and Ubiquitous Computing Special Issue:
Designing Multi-touch Interaction Techniques for Coupled Public and Personal Displays
Editors: Shahram Izadi, Aaron Quigley, and Sriram Subramanian

Synopsis:
This call for papers for a special issue follows on the successful workshop held at Advanced Visual Interfaces 2008 on the same topic (see http://ppd08.ucd.ie/ for workshop details). The special issue will focus on the research challenges and opportunities afforded by the combination of touch sensitive small personal input displays coupled with large touch sensitive public displays. Different touch-enabled devices rely on different types of touches (passive stylus, active stylus, fingers and tangible objects), the motivating question for this call is how do users switch between these devices and how to facilitate fluid transition from a collection of multiple displays to a single integrated multi-display environment.
Recent developments have seen the wide spread proliferation of both large shared- and small personal- interactive surfaces. Large interactive surfaces offer great potential for face-to-face work and social interaction and provide natural ways to directly manipulate virtual objects whereas small devices afford the individual a personal workspace or "scratch space" to formulate ideas before bringing them to a wider audience. Advanced visual interfaces can be built around a combination of both personal and public touch driven displays. Such computer mediated multi-device interaction between local touch-driven displays and shared public ones present a number of novel and challenging research problems.

Topics of interest to this special issue include (but are not limited to)

* Understanding the design space and identifying factors that influence Multi-touch interactions in Coupled Public and Personal Displays
* The impact of social conventions on the design of suitable interaction techniques for shared and personal displays
* Exploring interaction techniques that facilitate multi-display interfaces
* Personal displays as physical objects for the development of interaction techniques with shared multi-touch displays
* Novel interaction techniques for both personal and public multi-touch devices as part of multi-display environments
* Techniques for supporting input re-direction and distributing information between displays
* Developing evaluation strategies to cope with the complex nature of multi-display environments
* Ethnography and user studies on the use of coupled public and personal display environments
* Comprehensive surveys of the state-of-the-art that extend our understanding of the design space.

Submission details
Submissions should be between 6000 and 8000 words and authors are encouraged to use the Springer guidelines for authors, available at ftp://ftp.springer.de/pub/Word/journals
Submission in pdf electronic format should be emailed to Luke Conroy (luke.conroy@ucd.ie).

Dates
4th August 2008: 300 word abstract and expression of interest (optional)
15th August 2008: Feedback on abstract
29th August 2008: Full submission due
3rd October 2008: First Notification
5th December 2008: Revisions due
9th January 2009: Final Notification
June – Dec 2009: Planned publication

Tuesday, June 17, 2008

June 2008 BioMOBIUS in the news

Myriad of links to news items discussing BioMOBIUS

Brian @ Research@Intel day
Brian O'Mullane head of TTP software team UCD at Research@Intel day.

June 2008 BioMOBIUS Workshop UCD Sept 2008

BioMOBIUS Logo
University College Dublin - September 10th, 2008

The TRIL Centre is running a one day BioMOBIUS™ Workshop in University College, Dublin on September 10th 2008 for researchers.
BioMOBIUS™ platform is a closely integrated collection of hardware and software components. The platform supports the rapid deployment of biomedical applications in a drag and drop graphical programming environments that require the collection of a wide variety of datasets such as physiological and/or kinematic data. BioMOBIUS can be readily used in a variety of settings, ranging from research laboratories to people’s homes.

The BioMOBIUS research platform is aimed at researchers, clinicians and therapists who need, in the course of their work, to monitor and analyse the activity or other physiological characteristics of their patients or research subjects.

Contents:

The workshop will be a mixture of class materials, practical demonstrations and hands-on sessions. The hands-on sessions will cover the following topics using the BioMOBIUS platform
• Graphical Application Development process
• Graphical User interface Development process
• Digital signal processing tools / Review of in-built signal processing libraries
• Video processing, communication assistants etc.
• Third-party sensor integration.
• Biomedical application development
• Application program interface standards
• Block development process

TTP Team
Prerequisites
There are no prerequisites for this workshop. The audience is assumed to have knowledge of either signal processing or biomedical experiments. To participate in the hands on sessions participants should bring a laptop with the BioMOBIUS software environment preinstalled. BioMOBIUS is free to download from www.biomobius.org.
Participants who are interested in the block development process should have Visual Studio 2005 (with SP2) also installed. They should also possess some knowledge of C++ programming.

Attendance
There is no fee for the workshop.

Monday, June 16, 2008

June 2008 Lero - The Irish Software Engineering Research Centre

Lero

Today I am attending the Lero CSET year 2 review dry run in the UCD CASL. Our
colleagues from around Ireland have come together today to give an overview of
our research efforts to one another. We just heard from Professor Kevin Ryan
on the vision, mission, goals and achievements of Lero to date. Collectively
these have been very significant in terms of publications, graduate school,
industry engagement, conferences hosted in Ireland etc.

Professor Mike Hinchey who has just joined UL and is the research co-director for
Lero is giving us his personal vision and initial plans for Lero going forward to
years 3 and beyond. His background as Director of the Software Engineering
Laboratory at NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre will bring new vision and insight to the
problems of developing reliable and flexible evolving systems.

June 2008 BioMOBIUS in the news

Connecting People, Heath and Health Care

For nearly 10 years, Intel has focused on people-centered research that leads to innovative technologies to improve the care of aging and chronically ill individuals in the home. Personalized technologies based on this research can help address the rising costs of chronic disease and the aging population, while also allowing people to become more actively engaged in managing their health.

One example of Intel's commitment to multidisciplinary research is its involvement in the Technology Research for Independent Living (TRIL) Centre, a groundbreaking research collaboration jointly funded by Intel Corporation and the Irish government to explore technologies that will enable people of any age to live independent lives. One of the TRIL Centre's recent innovations is BioMOBIUS(TM), a low-cost research computing platform that can be easily tailored to quickly build a research tool in a simple way by those with limited technical knowledge.

Another example of Intel's research-driven solutions demonstrated today is a gait analysis system that reveals the key factors in people's gait (the manner or rate of movement on foot) and determines their risk of falling. While currently a research project, concepts like this would improve quality of life and reduce the burden on the country's health care system.

Wednesday, June 11, 2008

June 2008 VGV08 and Congrats to Mike Bennett

VGV logo
Irish Graduate Student Symposium on
Vision, Graphics and Visualisation(VGV08)
June 5th
Trinity College Dublin

On the back of an IRCSET exploratory Graduate Research Education Program
exploratory grant myself and colleagues in Dublin City University and Trinity
College Dublin organised VGV08
in June 2008. Our aim was to provide a stimulating space for young
researchers and Ph.D. students to present the results of their research
and to interact with their scientific peers, in a friendly and constructive environment.

Mike's PosterOne of my postgrads Mike Bennett received the best poster award at this event and
was presented with an award for his poster "Understanding Distance & How Humans
See Interfaces & Designs
" from one of our industrial partners.

Thanks to Trinity College Dublin and Gerard Lacey for the lions share of the
organisation on this! It was a great atmosphere and very interesting to see the
work on display. I look forward to following up with students on quadruped animation and
large graph drawing. Thanks also to Gerry for allowing a number of our
ODCSSS research summer interns to attend.

Given the wealth of research across Ireland in Vision, Graphics and Visualisation
I hope this becomes an annual event for academics, graduate students and industry
partners alike! Roll on 2009!

Saturday, June 07, 2008

June 2008 PerCom PC 2009

PerCom Logo
I was recently invited to serve of the international program committee for PerCom 2009 the Seventh Annual IEEE International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Communications. I look forward to taking part in this program committee for a conference series I haven't been involved with before.

June 2008 UbiComp 2008 PC and MSR Redmond

UbiComp 2008 Logo
From September 21 - 24 this year UbiComp 2008 Tenth International Conference on Ubiquitous Computing will be held in the COEX, Seoul, South Korea. I'm currently attending the paper review meeting in Microsoft Research Redmond as a member of the international program committee. I'm looking forward to a fruitful discussion of the many fine papers which have been submitted this year.

Microsfot Home Prior to the PC meeting we have been visiting Microsoft Research for the day on a tour arranged by John Krumm and AJ Brush. We have had a tour of the "Microsoft Home" (picture from Seattle PI [ videos ]) which provoked some interesting discussion amongst the PC members who attend the tour. The home is an aesthetically pleasing environment with nice examples of technology layered in. Afterwards we toured Microsoft Research where we saw some advanced visual interfaces such as new version of the Surface and the Tablet PC InkSeine. This was followed by a Ubicomp PC Madness where all those who attended presented a quick overview on their research to each other. The day concluded with Pizza, bocceball and a time to meet the Microsoft interns in Building 99. Thanks again to John and AJ for the event!

Monday, June 02, 2008

June 2008 EMBC Workshop Accepted

EMBC 2008 logo

Along with colleagues in the TTP in TRIL we had our proposal for a pre-workshop event at EMBC 2008 accepted. Our event is called "Platform Oriented Approaches to Biomedical Application Development for In-lab and In-home Deployments" to be held at the 30th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society August 20-24, 2008 Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. If you are interested in rapid application development, data collection in biomedical research (in lab or in home), remote and home monitoring then please come along to this event where we will cover much of the related work and demonstrate our BioMOBIUS research platform.

The success of biomedical systems that enable research both in lab and in the home is predicated on the available of ICT solutions which can be used throughout the research community. The success of technology in other domains such as the internet, personal computers has been based on a set of fundamental tools is necessary to ensure interoperability, rapid development, and user confidence. This workshop will review the challenges associated with development of systems to support biomedical research both in the laboratory and in the home. The key characteristics of a reusable toolbox will be defined. These tools, by necessity, will be heterogeneous and diverse – ranging from body sensor networks to mobile communication devices to home based monitoring systems. Practical demonstrations of how the features have been realized in an open, extensible and reusable toolbox will be based on the TRIL’s centre BioMOBIUS™ research platform will be included through out the workshop.
BIOMOBIUS comprises of both hardware and software components that support rapid application prototyping and development of biomedical research systems which incorporate a wide range of monitoring capabilities.

Friday, May 30, 2008

May 2008 Co-Chair PPD'08 - Naples Italy

PPD LogoAVI is going well but this Saturday I am co-chairing an international workshop on designing multi-touch interaction techniques for coupled public and private displays along with Shahram Izadi from Microsoft Research UK and Sriram Subramanian from Bristol University UK. The program for this workshop is now online and if you take a look you will see the range of very interesting workshop papers and participants. The objective of this workshop is to focus on the opportunities afforded by the combination of touch sensitive small private input displays coupled with large touch sensitive public displays. The main goals are to identify research challenges in the technology, application and evaluation of devices in such settings.

Workshop attendees will be invited to submit extended versions of their papers to a special issue of Springer's Personal and Ubiquitous Computing. The goal is to have the authors submit extended versions of their papers by Sept 2008 (we realize CHI is around the corner, but we have a tight deadline from Springer). More details on this will be available at the Workshop and linked from the website.

Thursday, May 29, 2008

May 2008 Session Chair AVI 2008

AVI LogoI am currently attending AVI 2008 where I am about to chair the session on Surface - Oriented Interaction. AVI 2008 is the International Working Conference on Advanced Visual Interfaces and is held every 2 years in Italy. I've only attended AVI once before but my students have attended the past four conferences. I really enjoy AVI each time I've come as you get some of the most interesting topics and presenters coming to show their work.

In the session I'm chairing today we have papers which study how clusters of objects on screen could benefit for a "starburst" region selection method contrasted with standard vornoi selection methods. Two papers looks at tabletop interaction, one with physical objects for control from Terrenghi et. al and another from researchers at MERL who have combined the streaming Anoto system with the Diamondtouch to explore Bimanual Pen and Direct-Touch Interaction. Back in 2002 I worked with the previous (non streaming) Anoto system so I'm glad to see this technology has moved on (not yet into the mainstream sadly). This work can be nicely contrasted with the VoodooSketch from the University of Lancaster. Another paper explores one handed interaction methods in "TapTap and MagStick". As an owner of an iPhone I look forward to TapTap becoming a standard feature on my phone.

Thursday, May 22, 2008

May 2008 Pervasive 2008 comes to an end

Pervasive 2008 LogoToday saw the end of my responsibilities for Pervasive 2008 the Sixth International Conference on Pervasive Computing, which was held in Sydney. Congratulations and thanks to all the organisers for their hardwork and dedication in bringing this event off without a hitch. I quite enjoyed the conference and it was nice to catch up with some old colleagues along with seeing some younger colleagues progress both their research and their careers. During the conference I was the co-chair for the Late Breaking Results, Video and Demo one-minute madness with my LBR co-chair Dr. Rene Mayrhofer who is a Guest Prof. for Mobile Computing in the Faculty of Computer Science at the University of Vienna. Rene was a pleasure to work with on the late breaking results and I'd like to compliment him for his professionalism and high level of attention to detail through the review, discussion and shepherding process. It's fair to say I also enjoyed the session as I got to wield a cricket bat to those who went over their time on stage (harmless I promise [ see pic ]). The following day I was a session chair for the Lessons learned from displays, games, and health applications which saw three good quality papers and presentations on a range of user experience issues. The day after (today) was the final day of the conference and along with 7 other colleagues I presented a one hour tutorial on Context-Rich but Keyboard-Free Pervasive Computing: Pervasive Computing User Interfaces. There is a book available for this day long tutorial.

LoCA 2009

I look forward to seeing everyone at LOCA 2009 the 4th International Symposium on Location and Context Awareness (LoCA) which will be held in Tokyo Japan in May 2009 just before Pervasive 2009 (which will be in Nara).
The important dates for LoCA are:
  • 18 December 2008 Submission Deadline
  • 13 February 2009 Author Notifications
  • 27 February 2009 Camera Ready Copy
  • 7-8 May 2009 Symposium (Tokyo, Japan)


Loca logo

Monday, May 19, 2008

May 2008 Pervasive Computing @ Home Workshop

Today I attended and presented at the Pervasive Computing @ Home workshop in Sydney. This workshop was focused on Pervasive Technology as applied specifically to a home environment. What was discussed was what distinguishes the home from other sites of technological innovation, approaches to studying behavior in a home setting including in-situ studies and living laboratories, and lessons learned from building and studying pervasive technologies intended for use in homes. I was mainly interested in this workshop for our TRIL research and development.
Presentations Included:
  • Pervasive Computing@ICS-Forth - C. Stephanidis, A. Argyros, D. Grammenos, X. Zabulis
  • Home Deployments for Independent Living - A. Quigley, M. McGrath, P. Nixon, and T. Dishongh
  • The eHome - a Practical Smart Home Implementation - L. Kaila, J. Mikkonen, A. Vainio, J. Vanhala End-User Programming for the Home: a Challenge - J. Couta
  • Bringing IMS Services to the DLNA Connected Home - J. Hjelm, T. Oda, A. Fasbender, S. Murakami, A. Damola
  • Adding Convenience to "Cohabitation of Conveience" - U. Rashid and A. Quigley
  • Connecting People Who Connect Devices - M. Newman and M. Ackerman

Friday, May 16, 2008

May 2008 Tabletop'08 PC - IEEE Tabletops and Interactive Surfaces 2008

I was today invited to serve on the Program Committee for Tabletop'08 the 3rd IEEE Tabletops and Interactive Surfaces Conference in Amsterdam in October this year.

TableTop Logo
The use of the tabletop as an input/output device is an exciting and emerging research area.
This cross-disciplinary domain brings together experts in projector based display systems, augmented reality, user interface technologies, multi-modal interaction, input and sensing technologies, CSCW, and information visualization.

The purpose of the workshop is to bring together leading researchers in the field so that they can present and exchange current results of ongoing investigations.
The 3rd IEEE TABLETOP Workshop will be held on October 2-3, 2008 in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
Sriram Subramanian & Shahram Izadi TABLETOP 2008 Co-Chairs

Tuesday, May 06, 2008

May 2008 LoCA 2009 Co-Chair

LoCA 2009 Logo

Along with Tanzeem Choudhury of Dartmouth College, USA I am the program co-chair for LoCA 2009 in Tokyo Japan.

4th International Symposium on Location and Context Awareness
May 7th-8th, 2009. Tokyo, Japan

The 2009 Symposium on Location and Context Awareness (LoCA) seeks new and significant research on systems, services, and applications to detect, interpret and use location and other contextual information. Context includes physiological, environmental and computational data whether sensed or inferred. In addition, context includes users’ activities, goals, abilities, preferences, interruptibility, affordances, and surroundings. With context, we can expect computers to deliver information, services, and entertainment in a way that maximises convenience and minimises intrusion. Developing awareness involves research in sensing, systems, machine learning, human computer interaction, and design.

LoCA 2009 Poster [ Download Poster ]

Saturday, May 03, 2008

May 2008 Paper Accepted IV08: Structural Clustering

Gaudin A. and Quigley A., "Interactive Structural Clustering of Graphs based on Multi-Representations", 12th International Conference on Information Visualisation IV08, 9 - 11 July 2008 in LSBU, London, UK (to appear)

Work based on Marie Curie International Re-Integration Grant. CoViAn: Comparative Visual Analytic techniques (e.g. structure plot, city plot and graph drawing) and their effectiveness in the exploration of large scale relational data sets. This research project operated at the junction of two sub-topics, namely large-scale relational information visualisation (graph drawing) and visual analytics. The aim was to build on our own research and existing research in these fields, and to provide a targeted comparison of three contrasting views of relational data display and exploration. Our hypothesis which we have proven through our empirical research, is simply that graph drawing techniques alone, for the exploration and navigation of large graphs are not sufficient and that a hybrid approach which incorporates multiple views of the data should be taken.

Thursday, May 01, 2008

May 2008 Paper Accepted AVI 2008: Perceptual Usability

Bennett M. and Quigley A., "Perceptual Usability: Predicting changes in visual interfaces & designs due to visual acuity differences", 9th International Working Conference on Advanced Visual Interfaces (AVI2008) Naples Italy May 2008

Wednesday, April 30, 2008

Apr 2008 Paper Accepted Pervasive 2008 LBR: DocTrack

Holland T. and Quigley A,, "DocTrack: automatic printed digital document tagging and remote retrieval", Late Breaking Results of the Sixth International Conference in Pervasive Computing (PERVASIVE 2008), Sydney Australia May 2008

Tuesday, April 22, 2008

Apr 2008 TRIL BioMOBIUS Launch

I am one of the Principal Investigators for the TRIL Centre (Technology Research for Independent Living) on the Technology Platform and today we launched the BioMOBIUS™ Research Platform. This is the combined effort of a dedicated and highly creative group of hardware engineers, software engineers, biosignal process engineers, researchers, designers and managers. Congratulations to the entire TRIL TTP team for great research platform.

NEWS Links:
UCD Research
CARDI

BioMOBIUS Logo

The TRIL Centre BioMOBIUS™ Research Platform an Open, Shareable Hardware and Software System

TTP TeamIn a clinical laboratory in St. James’s Hospital in Dublin, Ireland, an older woman walks along a mat that is embedded with motion sensors. The woman, who has experienced a recent fall, is also wearing several wireless sensors that monitor her heart rate and the motion of her limbs as she walks across the room. Small video cameras placed around the room also track her movement. As data is captured by the sensors and cameras, it is processed and streamed to a nearby computer. The computer screen displays a continually changing graph indicating irregularities in the woman’s gait that could lead to another fall—and a costly hospital stay. The clinical researcher viewing the screen asks the woman to slow her pace. Her gait becomes more regular and her heart rate slows. The clinician ends the experiment, gives the woman feedback on the results, and together they review a rehabilitation plan to help the woman improve her gait and hopefully, prevent another fall.

Scenarios such as the one above unfold on a regular basis at a clinic in St. James’s Hospital in Dublin, Ireland, enabled by the TRIL Centre BioMOBIUS™ Research Platform. The BioMOBIUS Research Platform is a combination of hardware, sensors, software, services, and a graphical development environment that enables therapists, clinicians and engineers to rapidly deploy technology solutions for biomedical research. The BioMOBIUS Research Platform supports the application needs of a broad range of stakeholders, from non-technical end users (such as older people) to hardware and software engineers.

Applications built using the BioMOBIUS Research Platform can be deployed in a wide variety of settings, from the clinical lab to the home. A typical application comprises wireless sensors that monitor markers such as gait stability, heart rate, and alertness; processing functionality, which
converts the sensor data into meaningful information; and a user interface, which enables the clinician to view the information and adjust application settings (for instance, to increase or reduce the frequency of sensor data collection).

The BioMOBIUS Research Platform was developed by the TRIL (Technology Research for
Independent Living) Centre— a groundbreaking research collaboration, jointly funded by Intel Corporation and the Irish government, to explore technology to help older people to continue living independently in the homes of their choice. Intel and the Industrial Development Agency (IDA) Ireland launched the Centre in 2007, jointly investing $30 million in this three-year research initiative involving researchers from Intel, University College Dublin, Trinity College Dublin and National University of Ireland (NUI) Galway.

The first version of the BioMOBIUS Research Platform was released on 22 April, 2008 and is being made freely available to the research community (for research only) by the TRIL Centre. It can be downloaded at biomobius.trilcentre.org.

Reusable, Extensible

A key challenge in health care research is the amount of time that must be devoted to technology development. ‘In a typical research project, 50 percent of a researcher’s time may be spent creating the foundational technologies required to get to the point of collecting data,’ says Dr. Aaron Quigley (UCD), the Academic Principal Investigator for the TRIL Technology Platform research strand. ‘Every researcher has to essentially reinvent the wheel. That’s inefficient, and it stalls research progress.’ The BioMOBIUS Research Platform addresses the problem by enabling researchers to leverage previous technology development efforts. The BioMOBIUS Research Platform is reusable and extensible, with an open architecture. The underlying model relies on the use of discrete functional
components or 'blocks' of code that perform certain tasks. Blocks can be reused or reconfigured to create new applications. This allows researchers to spend more time focusing on their research and less on developing technology. The first release of the BioMOBIUS Research Platform includes roughly 40 blocks that users can access to build applications, and anyone can build new blocks that others can reuse, modify and extend.

Simple, User-Friendly
The BioMOBIUS Research Platform addresses another challenge that researchers face: the
complexity of sensor software. ‘Much health care research relies on wireless sensing capability to collect data, but the software that comes with the wireless sensors usually is esoteric and quite difficult to use,’ says Michael McGrath, the Industrial Principal Investigator for the TRIL Technology Platform
research strand. ‘You have to be a specialized programmer to use the software effectively, due to its complexity.’

The software component of the BioMOBIUS Research Platform is complex too, but the complexity is hidden from most users. The software is based on the EyesWeb graphical development environment, created at the University of Genoa, and it makes the process of creating an application intuitive. The user drags and drops icons (blocks) onto a palette. Each icon represents an input (e.g., motion data or heart rate), output (e.g., a display of a graph) or processing function. The user connects the blocks in
the required order of execution to create an application. Even non-technical users can develop simple applications in a matter of minutes.

The technical requirements to use the BioMOBIUS Research Platform are modest. Running the BioMOBIUS Research Platform requires a medium- to high-specification PC or notebook computer (it runs on any x86-32 bit PC running Windows XP, but it works best with a multicore CPU). There is plenty of support at the BioMOBIUS Research Platform website (biomobius.trilcentre.org) for users who need it, including a discussion forum, documentation, guidelines and tutorials.

The BioMOBIUS Research Platform provides support for a variety of hardware, via wired and wireless interfaces. Default blocks are supplied to support a wide range of generic hardware devices (e.g., TCP/IP, Serial, and WDM camera devices). The BioMOBIUS Research Platform also currently supports the SHIMMER (Sensing Health with Intelligence, Modularity, Mobility and Experimental Reusability) family of wireless sensors, developed by Intel’s Digital Health Group, as well as Tactex Controls Inc. sensor products.

While the BioMOBIUS Research Platform is designed for ease of use, some engineering support likely will be required to configure and test new applications. In addition, non-technical users who want to develop new blocks will need the help of a software developer to write appropriate code (C++). BioMOBIUS Research Platform Applications

Today the BioMOBIUS Research Platform is being used primarily by TRIL researchers to help clinicians detect and prevent or ameliorate certain conditions related to ageing, such as falls and cognitive decline, and to help older people to strengthen their social connections. Among other applications developed using the BioMOBIUS Research Platform, TRIL researchers have created a neurological monitor, gait analysis and sleep quality applications, and a falls data capture solution involving the use of USB cameras.

Researchers within and beyond TRIL have shown a strong interest in developing other health care applications as well, including in-home diagnostic tests to identify biomarkers of diseases, such as diabetes and heart disease. Beyond health care, the BioMOBIUS Research Platform can be used for a range of applications that require wireless capture and processing of sensor data, such as sports science applications.

An Expanding Ecosystem

In 2008, applications developed in the lab using the BioMOBIUS Research Platform will be tested in a small number of homes. The TRIL researchers will apply the results to further refine the prototypes and inform their research. The test results also can be used by clinicians to make informed recommendations to the healthcare and/or social services agencies who serve the older people participating in the pilots.

The establishment of the TRIL Centre and launch of the BioMOBIUS Research Platform have put ageing and independent living. An ecosystem of activity has
been growing steadily around TRIL, with the Irish business community, Irish universities, and multinationals such as Intel collaborating to provide research and technology leadership in this important domain.

The TRIL researchers hope that the ecosystem will grow and expand beyond Ireland. ‘We’re anxious to have researchers around the world embrace the open BioMOBIUS Research Platform,’ says McGrath. ‘We want to build a global community of practice, with people creating and sharing new blocks and applications that others can use, so we can accelerate research progress.’ As future versions of the BioMOBIUS Research Platform are released, TRIL plans to host a series of national and international workshops to promote the platform.

‘The TRIL Centre is only scratching the surface of what we can do with the BioMOBIUS Research Platform, especially to empower older people,’ says Quigley. ‘Today there are 600 million people over the age of 60, and the UN projects that this figure will grow to almost two billion by 2050. Home-based applications that use the BioMOBIUS Research Platform could potentially help those two billion people to monitor their own health, remain in their own homes, and maintain their independence for as long as possible. That’s a huge opportunity to do good in the world. ‘

Tuesday, April 15, 2008

Apr 2008 SFI Funded CSET: CLARITY

Science Foundation Ireland is to fund a €16.4m technology partnership between UCD, DCU and Tyndall in the CLARITY CSET. I'm one of the collaborators in this centre and other academics in my research group such as Simon and Paddy and in my school in UCD are leading researchers in this world class research effort.

This CSET has grown out of the AIC who helped us secure our SFI UREKA grant in 2007 for ODCSSS, which continues to this day. Congrats to Barry and Alan and the rest of the CLARITY PIs.

Interested students should keep an eye open for future calls for both postgraduate and postdoctoral research positions with this new CSET.
News Coverage:

Tuesday, April 08, 2008

Apr 2008 TRIL TTP - CASL Research Day

TRIL TTP/ CASL joint research day
Date: April 9th 2008
Time: 9:00-14:10
Location: UCD CASL, Seminar Room (ground floor)
http://www.useamap.com/casl

  • 9:00 - 9:30 Welcome and coffee

  • 9:30 - 10:00 Dr. Joseph Kiniry - A Bit of Rigor Goes a Long Way - Making Small Changes to Software Process for Large Gains, School of Computer Science and Informatics UCD, CASL PI

  • 10:00 - 10:30 Dr. Brian Caulfield - Applications for wearable computing in sport and health, School of Physiotherapy UCD, CLARITY Associate PI

  • 10:30 - 11:00 Prof. Mark Keane - CSETs and their properties, Vice President for Innovation UCD

  • 11:00 - 11:15 Coffee break

  • 11:15 - 11:45 Dr. Scott Rickard - Techniques for Source Separation and Localization in Sensor Networks, School of Electrical, Electronic and Mechanical Engineering UCD, CASL Interim Director

  • 11:45 - 12:15 Dr. Colm Harmon - SHARE Ireland – Initial Findings from the Survey of Health and Retirement in Europe, Geary Institute UCD

  • 12:15 - 12:45 Rodd Bond - Recent urban improvement initiative for positive aging, Netwell Centre, Dundalk IT

  • 12:45 - 13:15 Dr. Terry Dishongh - TRIL roadmap, Digital Health Group Senior P.E., PRI Lead Technologist Intel / CTO TRIL Centre

  • 13:15 - 13:40 Lunch

  • 13:40 - 14:10 Dr. Aaron Quigley - Research Opportunities for use of BioMOBIUS in Chronic Cancer Care Research ideas informed from Pervasive Computing research, School of Computer Science and Informatics UCD, TRIL TTP PI, CASL PI

Monday, April 07, 2008

Apr 2008 EU Coordinating Action: CAPSIL

I have recently become the UCD PI for an EU Support Action CAPSIL we coordinate. CAPSIL is an ‘International Support of a Common Awareness and Knowledge Platform for Studying and Enabling Independent Living’. Our first kick off meeting is in London on April 10th with follow up meetings in Japan, Boston, Oregon and Ireland.

The aging of society is the single most important aspect of health care in the 21st century. Many intriguing ICT solutions are being developed within the EU, USA, and Japan for helping older people remain independent longer. However, these solutions tend to be fragmented and heterogeneous. The CAPSIL Coordinating Support Action (CSA) team is a strategic international coalition of University and Industrial partners that already have extensive teams developing hardware/software/knowledge solutions to independent living based on user requirements. All partners of CAPSIL are already members of regional and national centres on aging engaged in the process of helping to establish public policy and international standards. This support action is to launch initiatives, coordinated and disseminated by a series of workshops in the US, EU, and Japan (two per year for two years), with three fundamental goals:

* to develop a detailed CAPSIL Roadmap for EU research to achieve effective and sustainable solutions to independent living based on an in-depth analysis of independent living requirements and the ICT scenarios developed or under development in the EU, as well as the US and Japan (societies where the aging of the population are currently on par or exceeding the challenges that will be found within the EU).

* to support aging research by proposing procedures to incorporate all of these diverse solutions into WiKi entries (CAPSIL WiKi). These CAPSILs will enable researchers and the ICT industry to get the information they need to quickly and easily test solutions for prolonging independent living within the many and various heterogeneous communities. Only with this knowledge will the relevance and efficacy of technological solutions be maintained and be empowered with the capability to be adapted for various cultures.

* to use the CAPSIL Roadmap and the CAPSIL Workshops to help policy makers in the US and Japan coordinate research agendas and funding efforts across the three continents.

Thursday, April 03, 2008

Apr 2008 Belfast Agreement, 10th Anniversary Event

I've been invited to attend an event early this month in Belfast Agreement to mark the 10th anniversary of the Belfast Agreement. In addition to the Taoiseach Bertie Ahern and Senator Mitchell, others who will participate include General John de Chastelain, Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness, John Hume, Mark Durkan, M.P., MLA, Gerry Adams, M.P., MLA, Sir Reg Empey, MLA, David Andrews, Liz O’Donnell, Paul Murphy, M.P., Monica McWilliams, Lord Alderdice, Dawn Purvis, MLA, and David Adams.

Hosted by the US Ireland Alliance, it's an event I'm looking forward to as they will have 100 alumni of the George J. Mitchell Scholarship program and other young leaders from across Ireland.